Yoga District https://www.yogadistrict.com Mindfulness, Yoga & Lifestyle Wellness Mon, 10 Dec 2018 23:02:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 124397291 Teacher Feature Edgar https://www.yogadistrict.com/teacher-feature-edgar/ Tue, 04 Dec 2018 23:12:33 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10708 Meet Edgar one of our lovely teachers at Yoga District as he shares his journey of learning, practicing, and instructing yoga over decades and across continents. “The most important yoga […]

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Edgar – Yoga District Teacher

Meet Edgar one of our lovely teachers at Yoga District as he shares his journey of learning, practicing, and instructing yoga over decades and across continents.

“The most important yoga practice is not on your mat, but in the way you live.”

Check out Edgar’s class schedule below and keep reading to learn more about him:

  • Wednesday 10:00 AM, Yoga for Stress Relief (All Levels) @ H Street
  • Wednesday 12:30 PM, Flow Yoga 1-1.5 @ H Street
  • Wednesday 7:45 PM, All Levels Core Focused Flow @ 14th Street
  • Thursday 5:30 PM, Gentle Hatha Yoga for Abs, Back, & Legs @ I Street
  • Friday 12:15 PM, Gentle Yoga for All Levels @ Dupont

Teaching and Practicing Yoga

I don’t have a specific style of teaching Yoga. In the early morning I prefer strong core work to really move the energy and start my day in a more dynamic way. After that, I like to switch to a gentle flow or Restorative Yoga.

My first steps in Yoga were in Traditional Hatha Yoga under the guidance of my spiritual Master Guru Gil in Venezuela. After that, I have continued to study the Iyengar method and the anatomy of yoga. In my classes I teach the alignment and the anatomical benefits of each posture. In this way, the students can better understand the reason and benefits of each asana during the practice.

3 Lessons Learned from Yoga

1. The most important Yoga practice is not on your mat, but in the way you live. Nobody can make us happy. Nobody can make us feel peace. Happiness and peacefulness are already within us. We just have to look inward to find inner peace, and share it with others. In doing so, we will be happier and loving to all forms of life.

2. Life is beautiful. It’s important to practice contentment and smile from the heart. This means working to maintain an inner, positive attitude–even through difficult times. Enjoy the simplest things of life like walking, reading a good book or drinking a cup of coffee.

3. I have learned that helping others is the best way to develop our own potential. Karma Yoga (serving others) is an important part of my life.

Life Changing Moment

The most inspiring Yoga moment that I have had was my first encounter with my spiritual Master Guru Gil in his Ashram in Venezuela. Even though it happened a long time ago, when I was 22 years old, that unforgettable moment still remains alive in my mind and in my heart. Some experiences can’t be translated into words because nobody else would understand them. There are transcendental encounters that generate radical changes in our life.

Advice For New Yogis

I would say: “Yoga is for everybody, there are no limitations of age, gender or physical capabilities. The main objective of yoga is not about doing acrobatics. It is about learning how to breath well and release tension while feeling physically and mentally better.

There is no need to worry much about how flexible we are at the beginning of our practice. The main flexibility should be in our mind and then, our body will also become flexible.

Life in a Form of a Yoga Pose

I would choose Savasana (corpse pose) to describe my life. Savasana is a pose for total relaxation. Each day, at least for 10 minutes, It is necessary to release tensions, to cut the threads that bind us to the external world and be in touch with your own self. I don’t want to live in a hurry but in a relaxed way. For me, Savasana has a symbolic meaning because while our body is grounded, our mind can become free and enjoy inner piece.

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Introduction to Holistic Wellness https://www.yogadistrict.com/introduction-to-holistic-wellness/ Sat, 17 Nov 2018 21:01:22 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10691 Sally, a Yoga District teacher, has been struggling with severe migraine attacks since age of 15. For years she dealt with pain multiple times during the month. She would take […]

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Sally- Yoga District Teacher

Sally- Yoga District Teacher

Sally, a Yoga District teacher, has been struggling with severe migraine attacks since age of 15. For years she dealt with pain multiple times during the month. She would take strong pain killers while spending days in the dark and quiet.

She finally found s natural way to reduce the frequency of the attacks as well as duration of them. She is living toxic free, using all natural remedies for the past 17 months. She no longer needs to take any medication or pain killers whatsoever!

Read on to learn from Sally about holistic medicine philosophy and wellness practices.

Holistic Medicine Philosophy

Rocks balanced on the beach

Balance is the foundation of holistic wellness

We are super grateful for modern Western medicine, but let’s explore why holistic wellness is not just “alternative medicine.” Holistic wellness is a healthy way of healing our body & mind through adopting an all natural way of living. It is a complement to Western medicine.

According to the holistic medicine philosophy, one can achieve optimal health, the primary goal of holistic medicine practice, by gaining proper balance in life. Holistic wellness is the enriching, caring for, and balancing the whole self. This touches on several different components. Holistic health focuses on the mind, body, spirit and emotions.

MIND (Emotional Health)

Mind refers to the emotional health of a person. To achieving a balance in the mind: manage time wisely, share feelings wIth someone we trust, journal, and keep a positive attitude during times of stress.

BODY  (Physical Health)

Body encompasses physical health, which can be balanced by: moving the body, eating healthy, and getting enough sleep.

SPIRIT (Spiritual Health)

The Spirit is related to energetic health. To achieve balanced: spend quiet time every day, meditate, contemplate life’s purpose and dharma, plus find gratitude even in times of difficulty.

EMOTIONS (Social & Mental Health)

Emotions are about social and mental health. This can be balanced by: engaging and challenging the mind, pursuing personal growth, and maintaining healthy relationships. Try to remove yourselves from toxic relationships.

Holistic Wellness Approach

Holistic wellness starts with small steps towards balancing all these elements to pursue optimal health and overall wellness. For example, in Western Medicine, we use strong chemical painkillers to ease discomfort during migraine attacks. Whereas in holistic wellness, we look into the imbalance of all four compounds rather than solely addressing the physical aspect of it.

What is the root cause of the migraine? What is the person’s mind (emotional) health? Does the person have any personal problems that are troubling them? How is their body (physical) health? Are they struggling with any food triggers, sleep problems, etc.? What is their spirit (energetic) health?  Are they experiencing a certain fear? How is their emotional (social and mental) health? Are they feeling stress and anxiety? If so then, why and what can be done to alleviate these issues?

Holistic Wellness Steps & Tools

Holistic wellness utilizes many tools. Plants are one of the strongest resources that we use to balance all four compounds. The power of essential oils, derived from plants can optimize our overall wellness, healing mind, body & spirit, as well as aiding in controlling emotions.

For instance, frankincense oils are used for a multitude of reasons related to all four key elements of wellness. Frankincense oils can inspire courage, stabilize emotions in the mind, reduce inflammation, and promote cellular health in the body. These oils also improve adaptiveness and promote a meditative state for the spirit–on top of  alleviating fear and anxiety in our emotions.

Follow the simple steps below to start your holistic wellness journey:

  • Scrape your tongue first thing in the morning
  • Drink a glass of warm water with 2 drops of lemon oil
  • Sit in quiet for 3 minutes and follow your breath
  • Pop a drop of peppermint oil under your tongue to boost your energy and move your body, in a way that feel good for you
  • Use Frankincense oil as all natural anti aging skin care
  • Have a Frankincense oil handy to inhale anytime you need clarity of mind and/or to reduce feelings of stress or anxiousness
  • Use your Frankincense oil before bed for a deeper, better quality sleep

Learn more about the power of holistic medicine.

Holistic Approach Workshop

Stress

Migraine Headaches

  • 11/18 2:30-4:30
  • 14th street studio
  • Sign up here

In my upcoming workshop, we will look into all of these elements that can occur during at times of a migraine attack and, discover what tools to use for immediate ease without the need of strong painkillers. Please do remember that, if needed at times, it is okay to use Western medicine! I simply aim to equip you with holistic wellness’ tools to use in your own life. Join my workshop to learn more about the powers of essential oils and holistic wellness.  

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5 Yoga Myths Debunked https://www.yogadistrict.com/5-yoga-myths-debunked/ Sat, 03 Nov 2018 15:17:06 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10675 There are a lot of misconceptions surrounding who does (and does not) participate in yoga. But, it’s important to know that  the practice of yoga welcomes all people–not just one, […]

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There are a lot of misconceptions surrounding who does (and does not) participate in yoga. But, it’s important to know that  the practice of yoga welcomes all people–not just one, particular type of person.

Keep reading to learn about five of the most common yoga myths.

Myth 1: Yoga is Only for Flexible People

Side Plank - Class

This class practices several variations of side plank pose

There is often a false notion that yoga requires the ability to bend into pretzel-like shapes. Some people think that inflexibility automatically disqualifies them from trying yoga. These folks might say something like, “I’m not sure if yoga is for me, I’m not flexible at all.”

While certain poses do require a significant amount of flexibility, there is no “flexibility requirement” for practicing yoga. It does not matter if you can touch your toes in a forward fold. It does not matter how high you can lift your back leg while in dancer pose. What matters is that you show up on your mat ready to do your best and meet your edge–wherever that may be.

There are variations to every pose–including the ones that might typically be associated with a higher level of flexibility. In a yoga class, the teacher tends to offer several options of of one pose. You choose how best to practice that pose.

Myth 2: Yoga is Only for Young Adults

Yoga is open to people of all ages

There’s another misconception that yoga is only meant for people of a particular age range–namely, people in their teens, twenties, or thirties. But, that is false. Yoga is open to all. And that includes people of all ages. A 2016 Yoga in America study, conducted by Yoga Journal and Yoga Alliance, found that only 19% of practitioners fell between the age range of 18-29 years old, while 38% were 50 or older.

Yoga is also for children. As Rachel, a Yoga District teacher and certified ChildLight Yoga Baby & Toddler teacher points out, babies seem to “arrive on this earth as natural yogis.”

Myth 3: Men Don’t Practice Yoga

Encouragement Yoga

Yoga is practiced by all body types

Yoga is available for all sexes, genders, gender identities, and gender expressions. In the U.S., there’s a tendency to pigeonhole yogis into a particular type of demographic. However, this is incorrect. Yoga classes across the country are filled with–and taught by–all different types of bodies.

The 2016 Yoga in America study directly disproves this particular myth, demonstrating that men do practice yoga. In fact, an estimated 10 million men in the U.S. alone practiced yoga in 2016. This is a 6 million person upswing from 4 million male yoga practitioners in 2012.  If this pattern continues then there will be a steady yearly increase of men practicing yoga across the U.S.

Myth 4: Yoga is Too Much of a Commitment

Sleep Hygiene Meditation

Let the mat be a break from your busy day

Another commonly held belief is that yoga costs too much–in terms of both time and money.

There are no time requirements for yoga. While some people attend multiple classes a week, others may only go to a class a few times a month or even less.

The ability to get on the mat and to be away from the stress and noise of everyday life–especially in a bustling city like D.C–is what matters most. Not the number of hours you spend each week in the studio.

When it comes to cost, many yoga studios provide options to make yoga as accessible, available, and enjoyable as possible. For example, like many other yoga communities, Yoga District has a work/study program that allows people to volunteer in exchange for free, unlimited yoga.

Myth 5: Yoga is Just a Trend

Yoga is an ancient practice. It’s been found to have a myriad of potential health benefits including: lowering blood pressing, decreasing stress levels, improving sleep quality, and more.

Find Your Yoga flowchart

Find yoga classes & styles that complement your practice.

Beyond that, while there is no singular definition of yoga, the word most often translates to “union” and centers on a concept of connectedness. Yoga calls for the connection of the body to the breath, the mind to the spirit, and the individual to the community.

Remember: Yoga is for Everyone, Everywhere

Hopefully, if you’ve allowed any of these common myths to deter you from taking a yoga class, you’ll reconsider. The only way to truly know if yoga is right for you is to try it out yourself.

Check out the Yoga District class schedule to find the class that works best for you.

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Helping a Yoga Student https://www.yogadistrict.com/helping-a-yoga-student/ Mon, 22 Oct 2018 20:19:39 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10655 No two yoga classes are identical, but sometimes something truly unexpected may occur. What if, during your yoga class, one of the students becomes ill? How do the yoga teacher […]

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Yoga Teacher

Andrew- Yoga District Teacher

No two yoga classes are identical, but sometimes something truly unexpected may occur. What if, during your yoga class, one of the students becomes ill? How do the yoga teacher and the rest of the class help that person in need? This is exactly what transpired during one of Andrew’s Yoga District classes.  

When a student gets sick in class: stay calm, check their vitals, and, if necessary, call 911. Do your best given the circumstance.

Read on to find out what happened in Andrew’s class and learn how he maintained a safe space for all–even as an emergency situation unfolded.

 

Disclaimer: I have been first aid certified for 26 years–since I was 16. I am also qualified to teach first aid. When I had an office job, I was the health and safety officer. Imagine if I had no idea what to do to help the ill yoga student?

Assessing the Situation

Yoga ClassAfter receiving permission from the student, I wanted to share an incident that occurred during one of my recent classes. I believe it was an important learning opportunity for me and could be helpful for others. Here’s what happened:

In the middle of class, I noticed a student start to roll up her mat with a look of distress on her face. It seemed odd, but not completely unheard of as I’ve had students leave mid flow before. Per usual, I made my way to the student so I could assess the situation and also take a name.

The student was in a state of distress, saying she needed to leave. She wanted to get out of class because she felt unwell. I suggested she just lay at the back of the room. She was insistent about leaving, but I gently suggested she sit for a moment to first cool down. In no time at all, she was on the floor, reaching for the trash can, removing the lid, and sticking her head in it.

Helping a Yoga Student in Need

Now I had a sick student in a room of 25+ people that were still being directed in asana because class hadn’t stop. I was worried about her safety and the health of the class. Also, I was concerned for her dignity. I know I would not want my friends to leave me with my head in a trash can in front of a crowd.


I suggested we go to the restroom. This involved walking the entire length of Bloomingdale studio. I was still teaching. We almost made it, but she collapsed and I had to support her to the restroom. At this point, my full focus needed to be on the ill student. Thankfully, an experienced teacher, who I trusted, was a participant in this class. I yelled “Yassah, you teach now!” Because she is a wonderful teacher she did what needed to be done–seamlessly and without drama. (Thank you again,Yassah, and to the yoga student who helped me carry the sick student into the back room.)

I made sure that the unwell student was comfortable, lying on her back with planted feet. Then I stepped back into teaching the rest of the class. I periodically checked on the sick student. She was noticeably getting much better.

As we came to the closing sequence, I rolled out the student’s mat back out, where she had practiced, and invited her to come finish class. It felt like it was the right thing for the student, the class, and myself. It was also important to assess that student’s ability to function.

Several things have been on my mind about that incident:

  • What if I had not suggested she rest at the back of the room?
  • Or if I had not been insistent about her need to cool down?
  • What would of happen if she had left and collapsed in the street?

Then on the flip side:

  • What if, by suggesting she stay, I was taking agency away from her?
  • Or if my actions were interpreted as a show of male dominance or a disregard for her independence?

A Safe Space for All to Practice

Creating a Safe SpaceI wanted this student to feel respected with her needs and feelings heard.   As the yoga teacher, I decided to direct the situation towards safety.

Nonetheless, we negotiated a safe space that I believe resulted in the best outcome for that situation. I stayed calm while looking after the ill student and the class but inside, I was figurative making panicked somersaults.

I wanted to share this experience just in case it could benefit another teacher or student in a similar circumstance. It could have gone a multitude of ways. I was lucky the student accepted my suggestion to stay. If the event had gone another way, this could be a very different story.

Thank you for reading and I hope it adds to our collective experience and knowledge. I am always open to suggestions of better ways to handle situations. I did my best in the moment but can always try for better.

 

 

 

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Teacher Feature: Jennifer https://www.yogadistrict.com/teacher-feature-jennifer/ Fri, 05 Oct 2018 15:55:47 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10634 Meet Jennifer! She is one of our lovely teachers at Yoga District. For Jennifer, yoga has helped her to not only navigate many of life’s transformations but also create her […]

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Jennifer - Home practice

Meet Jennifer! She is one of our lovely teachers at Yoga District.

For Jennifer, yoga has helped her to not only navigate many of life’s transformations but also create her own positive self-transformations too.

“I love that this community is non-judgemental, loving, and supportive. I can’t express how much that has meant to me and what a positive impact it has had on my life.”

Check out her class schedule below and read on to learn more about Jennifer:

Monday 9:30 PM, Candlelight Restorative @ Bloomingdale
Wednesday 9:30 PM, Candlelight Restorative @ Bloomingdale
Friday 6:30 PM, Reboot Yoga + Restorative @ Columbia Heights
Saturday 1:30 PM, Restorative Yoga @ Bloomingdale
Saturday 3:30 PM, Ashtanga Flow (All Levels) @ 14th St.
Saturday 5:15 PM, Candlelight Restorative @ Columbia Heights
Sunday 8:15 AM, Ashtanga: Full Primary Series (Levels 1.5-3) @ Glover park
Sunday 5:00 PM, Candlelight Powerful Flow Yoga 1-2 @ Glover Park

Jennifer Head shot

Yogi Beginnings

My name is Jennifer; you can also call me Jen or Jenny 😉

Wellness is important to me. I ran cross country in high school then continued running afterwards to stay healthy and de-stress.

I grew up in Illinois, so I ran through prairie preserves to connect  with nature and loved the meditative aspect of it.

Running a marathon when I was twenty-two allowed me to check off a life dream. Then I searched for a new physical and mental outlet. Since high school, I’ve been complementing running with practicing at home with yoga videos.

Yoga has entered my life during transformations.

The first type of studio yoga I practiced regularly was hot yoga because that studio was close to where I lived. The runner in me liked to sweat. I tried different styles and gravitated to Ashtanga Yoga since it builds heat naturally. That’s what got me hooked!

I went through personal growth in my early twenties and was fortunate to find work at a yoga studio. Deepening my physical yoga practice guided me to get out of my head and become grounded in my body. This enabled me to start to live from a more authentic place.

Then I attended my yoga teacher training, where I learned meditation. This allowed me to dig deep to take my next steps — all from a place of love and gratitude for the journey.

I share yoga to help others experience the groundedness, self-assurance and non-judgemental awareness that I’ve gained through my practice.

Teaching Yoga

Jennifer Tree Pose

I love all the classes I teach!

I lived in South Asia for two years and have close personal ties to that region — I did my teacher training there! I love the opening and closing Sanskrit chants along with the traditional Ashtanga sequence. It keeps me connected to that time in my life and to the heart of what yoga means to me.

I love teaching restorative yoga and meditation because they remind me of the importance of depth and intention.

I personally enjoy a balance of intensity, relaxation and mindfulness in my yoga practice. I also like to challenge myself to try new things. So I love teaching flow classes to mix things up and often experiment with new sequences to match the vibes I get from each of the classes I teach.

Advice to New Yogis

I used to be intimidated by yoga studios; now I know there is no cookie-cutter way to be a yogi. I love Yoga District because it cultivates such an inclusive environment and allows us teachers to be our authentic selves.

Before I became a yoga teacher, I worked at a studio. This allowed me to deepen my practice without having to pay for expensive classes. If price is a barrier then I tell people to check out work/study opportunities.

When I experienced some of my most major transformations through yoga, I was not strong enough, flexible enough, or balanced enough to do a lot of poses. I share that with folks who are new to the practice because asanas, though empowering, are not the point of yoga.

Living and Learning in Washington, D.C.

I am grateful for the amazing friends that I have in this city and I love hanging out with them. I did a lot of deep personal work to cultivate a safe, healthy, uplifting group of people around me — my sangha. I was glad to see that Yoga District recently hosted the Building Community and Connection workshop so that more people can experience those benefits.

I also love the sense of community that I feel throughout DC. Krerk and the team at Aroi, the Thai place next to our Bloomie studio, let me sit inside their restaurant before I teach my class when it’s raining. Celeste at Trader Joe’s on 14th St. teaches me about wine when I stop in before my Saturday Ashtanga class.

I am blessed to really enjoy these day-to-day moments.

Jennifer Embryo Pose

Life in the form of a Yoga Pose

Garbha Pindasana (Embryo Pose) is my favorite pose! I have rolled around, collided with people, fallen apart, then pulled myself up, eventually laughed and smiled while building strength throughout it.

 

 

 

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How Being Mindful of Your Mindlessness is Beneficial https://www.yogadistrict.com/how-being-mindful-of-your-mindlessness-is-beneficial/ Mon, 24 Sep 2018 18:38:43 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10617 Mindlessness is Important People talk about mindfulness all the time but I can’t ever recall anyone talking about mindlessness. Patrice Ford Lyn, professional life coach, examines the benefits of combining  being […]

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Mindlessness is Important

People talk about mindfulness all the time but I can’t ever recall anyone talking about mindlessness.

Patrice Ford Lyn, professional life coach, examines the benefits of combining  being mindlessness and mindfulness.

Mindfulness

Many people confuse mindfulness with meditation. Meditation is a tool you can use to achieve mindfulness, but meditation isn’t a requirement. Mindfulness is the awareness of what’s going on inside and outside of your body. It is about being in tune with your surroundings. It means taking advantage of that knowledge to help you see the world and your problems in new ways. This can enable you to be more productive and innovative.

So, if you want to give mindfulness a try, take five minutes when you are alone and sit still. (You can set a timer.) How does your body feel? What thoughts or emotions come up?  If sitting in silence isn’t your thing, then consciously drink a cup of tea or slowly savor every mouthful of a meal.

Mindlessness

The key difference between mindfulness and mindlessness  is our level of consciousness.  We are in a state of mindlessness when we are unaware of what is happening to us or around us. We are on autopilot without a clear connection to what we are feeling or doing. For example, can you remember a time when you came home and crashed on the couch and started channel surfing, not really watching anything in particular?  Or, maybe you remember driving and missing your turn because you weren’t paying attention. I have been there.

Mindful Decision

Mirror sides of mindlessness and mindfulness

Mindlessness and mindfulness work well when used together.  If you have an important presentation coming up, spend focused time preparing, then take a break and do something that allows you to be on autopilot – like playing Angry Birds. When you come back to the presentation, you will likely find yourself with more clarity than if you pushed yourself to get everything done in one sitting.  

This finding isn’t an endorsement for long periods of mindlessness or driving on autopilot. It is an acknowledge that resting your mind has real benefits. So, what is the best balance of mindfulness and mindlessness in your life?  Now that you know that they both are beneficial, you can make a mindful decision.

For more information about Self-Care.

Setting Boundaries Workshops

Patrice Ford Lyn, certified professional coach

Four part series: every Saturday October 13th, 20th, 27th and November 3rd

H street studio
7:30-5:00 pm
Sign Up: here

In this four-part series we will be deepening our understanding of self-care, the ways and reasons it differs for individuals and communities, and how to develop and sustain a self-care practice that works for you. Ready to take better care of yourself?

To find out more about Patrice and her coaching work visit: www.catapultlifecoaching.com.

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Learn How to Set Good Boundaries https://www.yogadistrict.com/setting-good-boundaries/ Fri, 07 Sep 2018 19:00:25 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10587 “Yes I can.” “No I can’t.”  Simple enough, right? Are you good at setting boundaries? Your answer is likely a bit more nuanced than a simple “yes,” or “no.” Setting […]

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  • “Yes I can.” “No I can’t.”  Simple enough, right?
  • Are you good at setting boundaries?
  • Your answer is likely a bit more nuanced than a simple
  • “yes,” or “no.”
  • Setting personal boundaries is a form a self-care. Read on as Patrice Ford Lyn, professional life coach, discusses personal boundaries and how to improve setting them in your life.

    Personal Boundaries

    Let’s unpack them a bit.  

    Setting Boundaries

    Personal boundaries are physical, emotional and mental limits we establish to protect ourselves from being manipulated, used, or violated by others.

    How do we know when someone has crossed one of our boundaries?  Two feelings are also cues: discomfort and resentment.  For example, you haven’t set a firm boundary if you resent someone for complaining for 15 minutes every morning about their personal life.  A firm boundary in that situation could be any of the following responses:

    • “It is so good to see you, let’s catch up later” (and turn around)
    • “I can’t talk right now” (and go back to working)
    • “My morning is busy, I will come find you when I have a minute.”

    Setting Boundaries

    Does setting boundaries in the above example feel tough or easy for you? If it feels challenging, take a look at the 10 ways to build better boundaries. I imagine some steps will feel harder than than others.  Use that information to understand yourself a little better.  What fear, belief, or expectations do you hold that make a step particularly challenging?  

    Do you know someone who is great at setting boundaries? Don’t be so sure. There are six types of boundaries. It is easy to see someone and say they are good at setting boundaries. However, while they may be great at setting work boundaries, they could also have a hard time setting personal boundaries.  

    Each of us may feel a different level of ease with boundary setting in general now or in different parts of our lives. We can have a different relationship to our emotional boundaries than we do to our mental boundaries. Maybe our comfort with setting sexual boundaries differs from our comfort with physical boundaries? Take a look at the infographic and see what feelings arise as you think of boundaries in each of the six areas.                  

    Most people have trouble setting a boundary at some point. Are any of these six particularly easy or hard for you? Without judgement, what else have you learned about yourself?   

    Influences on Personal Boundaries

    6 Types of Boundaries

    Boundaries are deeply personal.  They are influenced by emotional factors that may not even operate at the conscious level. For example, insecurity about work deliverables may lead one to labor more than someone who feels like promotion is inevitable. Similarly, someone who is driven by being liked will have a harder time setting boundaries with friends than someone who is more attentive to their own self-care.

    Boundary setting is also often driven by familial and cultural expectations.  “That is not how we do things.” Sometimes we want to set a boundary but feel we can’t. “It’s okay if you don’t call me. It is okay if I have no one to talk to. I guess I will just have to talk to myself.” That is a lot of pressure.  You can set boundaries without feeling bad. What would make it easier for you is to set boundaries that aren’t driven by fear? A change in perspective can change everything.  

    For more information about Self-Care.

    Setting Boundaries Workshops

    Patrice Ford Lyn, certified professional coach

    Four part series: every Thursday October 4th, 11th, 18th and 25th

    14th street studio
    7:00-8:30 pm
    Sign Up: here

    This series will provide you with steps and practice for setting boundaries. We will explore why this is challenging, how to peacefully address the challenge, practice setting boundaries, and develop a personal plan for setting boundaries. Come and learn how to create healthy boundaries in a safe environment.

    To find out more about Patrice and her coaching work visit: www.catapultlifecoaching.com.

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    Examples of Women in Yoga History https://www.yogadistrict.com/examples-of-women-in-yoga-history/ Fri, 31 Aug 2018 22:06:10 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10584 Reverence for the female creative energy appears throughout yoga’s long history. Parts of the Vedas forbids men from performing any Vedic sacraments without his wife, and forbids men from performing […]

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    Reverence for the female creative energy appears throughout yoga’s long history. Parts of the Vedas forbids men from performing any Vedic sacraments without his wife, and forbids men from performing the sacraments once widowed.

    Another example of women’s longstanding central role in yoga history is the role of Para Shakti, the Cosmic Mother, or universal feminine creative energy in pure form. This is referenced in the Vedas, the Tantras, the Puranas and the Upanishads according to the text Bhavani Nama Sahasra Stutih (The Thousand Names of Bhavani):

    Worship of the Divine as Sakti, the Supreme Mother, creative puissance, is as old as the Rg Veda. It is not an alien graft as held by some… It is a fact that is often overlooked that the major Deities with feminine appellations in the Veda are not there as ‘wives’ of Gods. Illa, Mahi, Daksina are Divine Powers in their own right. Actually there is no question here as to who is superior, the male or the female Deity. The truth is that both are the same Reality, the same consciousness in two poises. The unique position of the Divine Sakti continues in the Upanisads. Uma Haimavati, Teacher of the Gods, She who opens their eye to the truth of existence, is lauded as Supreme. The Tantras continue the tradition though in certain lines of development they install the Sakti above Siva. The Gita speaks of Para Prakrti which is none other than Para Sakti. The Puranas register a change in approach. Their nomenclatures undergo a modification, their symbolism is more opaque. Even there we have Puranas that place the Devi in a special relationship with the Deva. At times the Gods are obliged to merge into the personality of the Saviour Mother. Aditi continues to be supreme in one form or other.

    From the book, Yogini, Unfolding the Goddess Within, by Shambhavi Chopra:

    In Hindu thought, the Yogini represents the Yoga Shakti herself, the Kundalini, as well as the resident powers or female deities of the different chakras. The Yogini possesses the power of Yoga herself and can awaken that in others, not only generally but at any point or place in the body or mind. A man’s ability to achieve the higher states of Yoga can be facilitated by his association with such a female companion who reflects this energy…

    This spiritual energy is not something that a man can extract or take from a Yogini at will. She chooses when and on whom to bestow her blessings. Her ability to enhance a man’s spiritual development depends upon her innate divinity as awakened and brought to fruition by her own yogic practices, which include envisioning herself in the forms of various Goddesses and investing herself with Their appearances and ornaments, tender and wrathful expressions, and supernatural powers for liberating beings. By conferring energy and grace upon a man – ”blessing ” or ”empowering” him – she is not weakening herself but rather sharing her energy voluntarily with one who has won her favour by meeting the various requirements that she may impose…

    The Goddess is a great Yogini, devoted to Shiva, yet matching His powers. She is the embodiment of pure energy, the Mother and matrix of all manifestation, the source of all time, space and creation. As they practiced Yoga together, Shakti accepted Shiva as her Guru, and he taught her the ways of transcendent being to guide her to her ultimate liberation. Shiva in turn also accepted Shakti as his Guru, and she initiated him into his ultimate liberation through putting him in touch with the supreme power of consciousness.

    Gargi Vachaknavi, a female ancient Indian philosopher who some credit with writing many hymns in the Rg Veda, is another figure confirming women’s long-standing importance in the yoga tradition. In The Yogayajnavalyka Samhita written by Sage Yajnavalkya around the 8th century BCE, Gargi challenges Sage Yajnavalkya’s understanding of the soul. Desikachar, whose text Heart of Yoga you may have read by now, translated The Yogayajnavalyka Samhita into English.

    Scholar and author Vidya Dehajia cites another example of reverence for women in the form of worship of the 64 Yoginis:

    The worship of 64 Yoginis is seen commonly between 800 and 1300 AD and temples dedicated to Yoginis were built during this time… In most of the well-conserved temples, the sculptures of Yoginis are intact and none of them are erotic as in other temples. This is because this cult did not believe in sex as a path to self discovery.

    An example in more recent times, Ramakrishna’s wife was regarded her as an incarnation of the goddess Kali. His disciples addressed her as divine mother. If you’re interested in learning from living female yogis who some believe are embodiments of the divine feminine, please look into Mother Meera, Sri Mataji Nirmala Devi, and Amma the Hugging Saint, to name a few.

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    Teacher Feature Edwin https://www.yogadistrict.com/teacher-feature-edwin/ Fri, 24 Aug 2018 16:19:43 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10561 Meet Edwin one of our lovely teachers! Learn about his personal journey with yoga and how he encourages students to have their own transformative experience. “Yoga has helped me nurture […]

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    Meet Edwin one of our lovely teachers! Learn about his personal journey with yoga and how he encourages students to have their own transformative experience.

    “Yoga has helped me nurture my own individuality.”

    Feel feel to attend one of his classes and read on to learn more about Edwin.

    Edwin’s Class Schedule:

    • Tuesdays 8:00 PM, Flow Yoga 2-3 @ H Street
    • Thursdays 6:35 PM,  Flow Yoga (All Levels) @ DuPont

    Introduction to Yoga

    I found yoga through self-inquiry as part of a medical condition. I was hooked after my first class (Hatha Yoga with Yoga Nidra).

    Edwin - Yoga Teacher

    Meet Edwin – One of Yoga District’s lovely teachers

    Teaching Yoga

    Sharing yoga with others is something I am passionate about. It fills my life with joy and gratitude.

    My personal journey after practicing yoga is the reason I teach. I am now more grounded and have a different outlook on life as a whole. Yoga has helped me nurture my own individuality. As a teacher, I acknowledge and celebrate each student’s uniqueness and promote self-care.

    I encourage students to listen to the body, the breath, and the heart. I always say that we are only given one body in this lifetime. As such, we must treat our bodies like temples.

    I like to challenge students with poses they are uncomfortable with or poses they feel they don’t have what it takes to master. A challenging pose for students is classic headstand. Classic headstand (Salamba Sirsasana) relieves stress and anxiety, but it also makes people feel empowered once they get over the fear of being upside down. I had a moment of exhilaration when I was first able to hold a classic headstand in a room packed with fellow students. I would love to see other students in my classes have the same experience.

    Teaching Meditative Yoga Flow

    Edwin's Class

    Edwin teaches yoga class

    My favorite style of class to teach is Meditative Yoga Flow. It allows the student and the teacher to integrate breath work with yoga asanas, which in turn ignites the energy that flows through the inner self. This style of class also brings us back to the basic tenets of the yoga practice: one universe comprised of many souls connected as one with one common purpose.

    Challenging Yoga Moment

    I remember judging a person with a disability who came to one of my classes and changing the style and level of difficulty based on the

    experience. I learned that in the process, I was judging myself. I immediately realized I needed to accept my own shortcomings and went back to my original sequence.

    Yoga Practice Advice

    Practice from the heart and always remember to pay it forward. The way yoga comes to each of us is unique and it has different meanings. Yet, at the heart of every practice, there is a quest for unknown answers that resides within each individual.

    A yoga practice is not static. There are peaks and valleys. To stay motivated and to continue growing in the practice, one needs to acknowledge and accept this fact.

    Advice to First Time Yogis

    You must try the practice at least once. When you do, remain open to the experience. Don’t place any labels and hold no judgement. The experience will show itself in ways you could never imagine.

    3 Lessons Learned from Yoga

    1. Respect for self and others

    2. Love for self and others

    3. That I am an imperfect, perfect being

    DC Yoga Community

    My favorite thing is the closeness of the yoga community because there is no sense of competition.

    I believe that everyone in this world can benefit from yoga practice at any levels. Given that DC is so diverse, I don’t think that any particular group can benefit more than others. Every single person in this city can benefit from the practice. However, each person’s experience will be unique to their own journey.

    Edwin - Yoga Teacher

    Edwin practices yoga in his home.

    Life in a Form of a Yoga Pose

    Peacock (Mayurasana) pose took me years to master. Just like it took me years to work on the parts of my inner self that make me the person that I am today.

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    Sleep Hygiene Should Be on Your To Do List https://www.yogadistrict.com/sleep-hygiene-practice/ Sat, 04 Aug 2018 23:00:32 +0000 http://www.yogadistrict.com/?p=10518 A good night’s sleep is a form of self-care. Pamela is a certified Yoga Alliance Registered (E-RYT 500) Instructor, Sleep Wellness Coach, HeartMath Coach and Mindful Yoga Therapist. She had struggled […]

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    Pamela Stokes Eggleston

    Pamela

    A good night’s sleep is a form of self-care.

    Pamela is a certified Yoga Alliance Registered (E-RYT 500) Instructor, Sleep Wellness Coach, HeartMath Coach and Mindful Yoga Therapist.

    She had struggled with insomnia, secondary PTS and stress which led to sleep deprivation. Read on to find out how a Sleep Hygiene Practice changed her life and how it could benefit you too!

    Sleep Deprivation

     Sleep Deprivation

    Sleep Deprivation

    Most of us don’t get enough of sleep. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 70 million people in the United States are sleep deprived.  

    I was one of those people. As the spouse to a wounded warrior with post-traumatic stress (PTS) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), I experienced sleep deprivation along with my husband.  What I didn’t do was deal with the issue head-on. Subsequently, I felt drained of energy and I was not fully functional. I quite Ambien, a prescription medication, and created a self-care regimen.

    What’s worked for me:

    • regular yoga practice
    • develop a nutrition and natural lifestyle regimen

    Through this process, I learned that sleep was invaluable and necessary.

    Sleep Hygiene: Self-Care Practice

    Aloe Vera Plant

    Try having an Aloe Vera Plant in the bedroom

    Sleep hygiene is a group of habits that help you to get a good night’s rest.  As a sleep deprived nation, a sleep hygiene practice is critical.  It’s a vital component to any self-care plan.

    Some immediate tips that you can start using today:

    1. Eliminate all of the blue light in the bedroom.
    2. Use the bedroom for two things: sleep and sex.
    3. Get some oxygen friendly plants to add to the bedroom décor like aloe vera or English ivy.
    4. Use relaxation tools like deep breathing and body tensing and releasing before going to bed.

    Relaxation Response

    Savasana

    Try Progressive Muscle Relaxation before bed

    Use methods to promote the relaxation response (a term created by Herbert Benson, MD in 1974):

    The stress (“fight-or-flight” ) response stems from our sympathetic nervous system (the accelerator) is the opposite of the relaxation response (state of deep relaxation). Whereas, the “rest and digest” of the parasympathetic nervous system (the brake) alters the short and long term physical and emotional responses to stress.

    Yoga is also a great way to cultivate the relaxation response and help us get better sleep.

    Yoga 2 Sleep Training

    • Saturday 8/11- Sunday 8/12
    • 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
    • Find out more information and sign up here
    Pamela Stokes Eggleston

    Yoga 2 Sleep Training

    My challenging sleep journey is the main reason why I created Yoga2Sleep and its Yoga Teacher Training (Y2S YTT).  

    In this training:

    Five main areas will be discussed throughout this training:

    1. physical
    2. mental
    3. emotional
    4. spiritual
    5. environmental

    Participants will come away with the tools to teach yoga for sleep and relaxation as well as to create a comprehensive self-care regimen.

    If you are interested in Sleep Hygiene then find out more information from our Sleep Hygiene series.  

     

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