Teacher Feature: Lily

Jun 2, 2019   //   by Charon & Madison   //   Teacher Feature, The Blog, Yoga District Community, Yoga Teacher  //  No Comments

Meet Lily, one of our teachers at Yoga District. Learn about her experiences with yoga and why she is so passionate about teaching.

Check out Lily’s schedule below and sign up here.

  • Monday 1:45 PM, Flow Yoga 1-3 with Meditation @ Dupont
  • Monday 5:15 PM, Flow Yoga  2-3 @ I Street
  • Tuesday 12:30 PM, Alignment Flow Yoga 1.5-2 @ I Street
  • Wednesday 12:30 PM, Powerful Yoga 1.5-3 @ Bloomingdale

Read on and stop by one of her classes to get to know her better.

Practicing Yoga

If my life was the form of a yoga pose it would be locust(1) because I’m always laughing from the belly and keeping an open heart.

A while ago, when I was trying to achieve forearm stand, a teacher told me that the only way to do it was to be unafraid of falling out of it. With fear, it is impossible to gain enough momentum to get up there in the first place. Only by being unafraid to fall can you stand. I think about that every time I’m afraid of trying anything.

Lessons Learned from Yoga

  1. Nonviolence is where true power exists.
  2. There is no such thing as perfect balance. Finding balance is a constantly evolving process that takes honesty, humility, and focus.
  3. Always make time for yourself.

Teaching Yoga

Sharing yoga with others has made me realize how much we break ourselves to meet the demands of society.  I spent a year working at ABC News and I never felt more unhealthy in my life. After 13 hours a day behind a desk, I was in both physical and mental pain.  I decided to let go of the ego and pride of network television and connect with my true self. I feel lucky now to understand the inner workings of my body and mind. Everyday, I notice people who are burdened by the aches and pains as a result of a lifestyle oriented around a desk.   It makes me realize my calling is to help bring people back to themselves. I want to help others to feel comfortable inside of their bodies. This feeling is not just a healthy lifestyle luxury. It is important to and for everyone.

My Yoga Classes

I like teaching power flow yoga (2). I am amazed by what my students are capable of during class. I find that in a power flow class, people can truly relax because their minds are totally occupied by the demands of the yoga practice, both mental and physical.. I live for the sudden wave of peace and euphoria that occupies the studio after a truly challenging sequence.

I keep my classes filled with music as we move to  unique flows. To keep my practices comfortable, I avoid using  too many choreographed pose sequences. You can expect to think differently and “re-enter” your own body in my classes. I tell my students to focus on their breathe first and to let their breathing guide the movement.

At the start of a class, I connect with every one of my students so I can best guide their practice towards their needs. We won’t start until I know about every injury in the room and have reviewed safe alternatives for the sequence. This is part of how I show my care for my students and commitment to making them feel welcomed and supported.

Empowering & Relaxing Yoga Poses

I empower my students by including Goddess Pose(3) in our practice. When my students need to relieve stress I recommend meditating in Mira mudra(4). “Mira” means ocean and a mudra is a hand gesture. This hand gesture helps promote easy breathing and a state of flow. It also promotes circulation, thereby helping the body flush out toxins and restore the blood.  I have seen my students’ faces transform into relaxed, peaceful expressions while in this posture. I always remind people that focusing on the ocean can help relieve stress even if students are not open to the spirituality of yoga. I explain that it is part of our true nature to exist in waves.  Mira mudra helps release pressure and stress in the moment and lets us know that it, too, shall pass.

Advice for Yogis

I always tell new students that if they have breathed, they have done yoga! Trying a class is just one step further.

For current students trying to stay motivated in their yoga practice I recommend signing up for classes in advance to make a promise to yourself. After all, if you have already committed to a class you are more likely to attend and reap the benefits, even when you are hungry, tired, or feel like staying in on the couch. Once you arrive, I promise you’ll be happy you came!

DC Yoga Community & Advice for Sharing Yoga

Don’t be discouraged if it’s difficult at first to share yoga with others. It takes a while to get comfortable teaching. If you were drawn to teaching yoga, it means you have a gift to share, and it’s worthwhile to work through your turbulence. I really like that the yoga community in the District is filled with people that seem to be standing up for some type of justice. I am so humbled and inspired to be serving such heroes and heroines.

Sources:

  1. Locust Pose, https://www.yogajournal.com/poses/locust-pose
  2. Power Yoga, https://poweryoga.com/blog/what-is-the-definition-of-power-yoga/
  3. Goddess Pose, https://www.yogapedia.com/definition/7246/goddess-pose

Mira mudra, https://www.globalfamilyyoga.com/blog/mira-mudra-for-easeful-breathing

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The Teachers

The diverse family of DC yoga teachers at Yoga District are dedicated to making yoga accessible to everyone through a huge variety of yoga class types, from vinyasa flow to restorative and beyond. Most Yoga District teachers are graduates of Yoga District’s nationally-attended 200 hour teacher training program. All Yoga District classes focus on coordinating breath with body movement to promote flexibility, strength, and peace of mind. We strongly believe in yoga as therapy, so catch one of our classes whenever you need a healthy dose of self-care.
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The Next Step

The Yoga District 200 and 500 hour teacher training certification programs, registered by the Yoga Alliance are unique in their emphasis on diversity of teaching styles studied, personal attention, and trauma sensitive yoga. It's no coincidence that Yoga District is regularly voted the leading studio in the nation's capital, and that most of its classes are taught by graduates of its training program. As a full time yoga school, small group trainings are led up to eight times a year by a dedicated faculty including Jasmine Chehrazi, contributor to the Harvard Karma Yoga Project teacher training, teacher training faculty at George Washington University, Yoga Alliance Standards Committee Advisory Board Member, Yoga Activist Founder, and Yoga Service Council Advisory Board Member. So take your practice and community involvement to the next level by joining a training. There's a reason why our graduates call the training "transformative."
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